Glassblower.info geographical super-search of glass art now covers all 50 US States and 20 Countries

During the summer of 2006 (difficult to believe that it’s been six years already!) I took a PHP and MySQL class, and during that class I created the structure and initial programming of the www.glassblower.info super-search database at http://www.glassblower.info/super-search.html which I visualized as a Glassblowing School/Class/Studio/Artist Geographical Search tool with 32 search criteria.

Today that database has grown to over 400 entities, in all 50 US states (plus PR and DC) and 20 countries!

Planning a trip? Take a look to see who is in the area you will be visiting…

One of my goals was not only to provide a deep database with contact information, textual information, and images, but also to integrate with the Google Maps API (to make driving to visit that much easier).

Recently I used another tool, the Google Chart Tools to create a dashboard to visually show a summary of the www.glassblower.info super-search database.

Below are the four contemporaneous dashboard charts as of July 15, 2012:

Glassblower.info - Super-Search Database - Dashboard - July 15 2012 - Total of 402 records in 20 Countries

Glassblower.info - Super-Search Database - Dashboard - July 15 2012 - 50 US States plus PR and DC

Glassblower.info - Super-Search Database - Dashboard - July 15 2012 - Cities with three or more records

Glassblower.info - Super-Search Database - Dashboard - July 15 2012 - 11 Categories

If you know of any other schools, studios, artists, galleries, etc. who would benefit from being added to the super-search database, please visit the Add-My-Studio web page here.

Posted in Glassblowing Miscellaneous, Linux Apache MySQL PHP (LAMP) | Leave a comment

Does BIDNIP lie to its customers? You decide for yourself!

BidNip is an auction sniping service.

Or I should say, is an auction sniping service WHEN IT WORKS?

And when does it WORK?

According to its web site’s STATUS PAGE, BidNip has worked without any type of preventive maintenance or corrective maintenance for nearly THREE YEARS. Visit that web page to see for yourself: http://www.bidnip.com/news.html

See the print-screen below (taken today July 12, 2012), and the emails from BidNip Tech Support, to decide for yourself if BidNip tells the truth, or lies to its cusotmers!

Whether or not BIDNIP lies is an IMPORTANT Question, because BidNip is a company with whom we entrust our must valuable financial assets – our ability to bid on expensive ebay auctions?

I wasted time, trying two different computers today, believing that if BidNip status web page says there is no problem, and that they have 64/64 servers online, the problem must be on my end, right? No, BidNip support acknowledges their problems in writing in EMAIL but NOT on the STATUS WEB PAGE.

My question, which I asked three times, and specifically the THIRD time in all capital letter:
***WHY*** DID***BIDNIP ***NOT***UPDATE***ITS***STATUS***WEB*PAGE*** ???

(click on the image to see FULL size so you can see no updates since 2009!)


Does BIDNIP lie to its customers?

I asked BidNip Support THREE TIMES if they update their status web page, and here are the answers I got today (by the way, I’m not showing headers, this is the way their emails are actually delivered/displayed in Thunderbird):

Clearly (to me), from the fact that I received identical replies to two different emails, BidNip does not even bother to read its customer’s emails, instead preferring to robot reply non-answers to important questions. You decided for yourself:
***WHY*** DID***BIDNIP ***NOT***UPDATE***ITS***STATUS***WEB*PAGE*** ???

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: BIDNIP SUPPORT – Are you guys doing major maintenance/upgrade right now?
From: BidNip Support
To: tonyspatti@comcast.net

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Reply-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
Errors-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
X-Mailer: BidNip Online Support Mailer v1.3
X-NoSpam: User requested response from BidNip.com Support.
Message-Id: <20120712232200.81EC42108005@184163-web1.www.bidnip.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 16:22:00 -0700 (PDT)

Hello,

Thank you for your email. Our programmers were adding space and updating the site in an attempt to make the site better for all of our customers and unfortunately the site went down for a few hours we are very sorry for the inconvenience. Everything should be up and running now. You may have to resnipe any pending bids and your completed snipes may take some time to reappear but our programmers are working on getting those back to you. It looks like your history of won auctions is still available. Once again we are very sorry for the inconvenience.

Thank you,
BidNip Support
http://www.BidNip.com/

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: BIDNIP SUPPORT – Are you guys doing major maintenance/upgrade right now?
From: BidNip Support
To: tonyspatti@comcast.net

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Reply-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
Errors-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
X-Mailer: BidNip Online Support Mailer v1.3
X-NoSpam: User requested response from BidNip.com Support.
Message-Id: <20120713012343.351162108005@184163-web1.www.bidnip.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 18:23:43 -0700 (PDT)

Hello,

Thank you for your email. Our engineers isolated a corruption in one of the databases and have fixed the issue. Thank you for your feedback and for helping us to find the issue. Everything has been restored and the site is ready to help you continue to win more great stuff!

Thank you,
BidNip Support
http://www.BidNip.com/

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: BIDNIP SUPPORT – Are you guys doing major maintenance/upgrade right now?
From: BidNip Support
To: tonyspatti@comcast.net

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Reply-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
Errors-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
X-Mailer: BidNip Online Support Mailer v1.3
X-NoSpam: User requested response from BidNip.com Support.
Message-Id: <20120713014137.52BDE2108005@184163-web1.www.bidnip.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 18:41:37 -0700 (PDT)

Hello,

Thank you for your email. Our engineers isolated a corruption in one of the databases and have fixed the issue. Thank you for your feedback and for helping us to find the issue. Everything has been restored and the site is ready to help you continue to win more great stuff!

Thank you,
BidNip Support
http://www.BidNip.com/

After posting this blog, I asked BidNip management if they wanted to comment on it, and to their credit, I received a very prompt reply, as I had multiple times earlier today.

Sadly, though, you will note that the question as to whether or not BidNip’s status web page tells the truth of the status of the BidNip service, continues to be a sadly unanswered question. Why should that question be so difficult to answer, for an online service company?

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: BIDNIP SUPPORT – I just published a BLOG with this title: Does BIDNIP lie to its customers?
From: BidNip Support
To: tonyspatti@comcast.net

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Reply-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
Errors-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
X-Mailer: BidNip Online Support Mailer v1.3
X-NoSpam: User requested response from BidNip.com Support.
Message-Id: <20120713022820.067FA2108005@184163-web1.www.bidnip.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 19:28:20 -0700 (PDT)

Hello Tony,

Thank you for your email. Of course we don’t lie to our customers, we value our members and all of their feedback. During operations today our engineers isolated a corruption in one of the databases and have fixed the issue. Thank you for your feedback and for helping us to find the issue. Everything has been restored and the site is ready to continue to help you win more great stuff!

Please feel free to add this post to your blog and we sincerely apologize for the inconvience experienced during the temporary outage today. We will be adding additional alerting to the site to prevent a reoccurance.

Thank you,
BidNip Support
http://www.BidNip.com/

Oh, wait now, look what just showed up in my inbox — NOW you think I’m right, after how many emails and a blog post, and robo answers with the same text in the last three emails from BidNip!?

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: BIDNIP SUPPORT – I just published a BLOG with this title: Does BIDNIP lie to its customers?
From: BidNip Support
To: tonyspatti@comcast.net

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Reply-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
Errors-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
X-Mailer: BidNip Online Support Mailer v1.3
X-NoSpam: User requested response from BidNip.com Support.
Message-Id: <20120713025846.75FC82108005@184163-web1.www.bidnip.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 19:58:46 -0700 (PDT)

Hello Tony,

Oh thank you, you are correct, that link has not been updated as we were responding to tech emails and on facebook. We will have our engineers fix that issue.

Thank you,
BidNip Support
http://www.BidNip.com/

Looks like maybe I’m finally getting my point across, that the status page is worthless, not having been updated for nearly THREE YEARS:

——– Original Message ——–
Subject: BIDNIP SUPPORT – I just published a BLOG with this title: Does BIDNIP lie to its customers?
From: BidNip Support
To: tonyspatti@comcast.net

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Reply-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
Errors-To: tsupport08@bidnip.com
X-Mailer: BidNip Online Support Mailer v1.3
X-NoSpam: User requested response from BidNip.com Support.
Message-Id: <20120713032957.CF64E2108005@184163-web1.www.bidnip.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 20:29:57 -0700 (PDT)

Hi Tony,

Well, kind of embarrasing, but we haven’t been updating that link. We have made lots of changes to the site and are posting updates in facebook. We are in the middle of updating the site design and, well, like I said, embarrasing, but we’ve been making lots of changes and upgrades and ugh, have not been updating that status link on BidNip. We will either start making the updates there or link the updates to our facebook page. I can’t thank you enough for pointing that out. Seriously, that makes us look bad and it is really just because we were updating in other venues. We work with RackSpace who provides our server hosting and that company is rock solid. I’ve been posting the site upgrades and notices on server upgrades in conjunction with RackSpace on facebook.

Kristina Torsiello
President, Marketing & Sales
kristinat@bidnip.com

Looks like BidNip did neither of the two status-reporting enhancements considered above, sometime during the second half of July 2012 they simply removed their “News & Status” link from their Left Navigation menus. I personally don’t feel that is the best solution, but hey, it was not updated for the last THREE years anyway…

new BidNip left navigation menus - removed news and status link

Posted in Computer Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

Blacksmith David Woodward makes Glassblowing Raking Tool

Blacksmith David Woodward was demonstrating at the Scranton “Arts on Fire” Festival (June 1-3, 2012) and made me this unique raking tool!

I am going to make a wild guess: That I am the only glassblower in the world to have a raking tool make from a railroad spike (rail spike)!

Blacksmith David Woodward makes Glassblowing Raking Tool

Check out the photos of David Woodward making my raking tool!

And what can I make with this unique raking tool? How out this large footed bowl? Front and Top views below.

Tony Patti Footed Glass Bowl make with Blacksmith David Woodward raking tool made from railroad spike - front view

Tony Patti Footed Glass Bowl make with Blacksmith David Woodward raking tool made from railroad spike - top view

Posted in Glassblowing Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

Measuring electrical usage (watts and dollars) of a Dell PowerEdge server

The P3 International P4400 Kill A Watt Electricity Usage Monitor, which is available from Amazon.com for only $17.48 (a substantial discount from normal retail price of $50.00) is simply amazing, whether you use it around the house or to measure the electrical usage of computers, servers, network equipment, and peripherals.

As an indication of how popular this P3 Kill-A-Watt device is, it is ranked #37 in Amazon’s Tools & Hardware category. #37 is nothing to sneeze at — out of a MILLION products in that Tools & Hardware category!

And to make this an even better deal, this item is shipped and sold by Amazon itself, and eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25 — and with gift-wrapping available from Amazon, it would certainly make an excellent gift!

Below you can see the Watts of electrical usage of my Dell PowerEdge server used to run this (and other) websites. It shows 217 watts usage. The measurement varied slightly between 215 watts and 218 watts, I picked a median value to display below. Because the P3 Kill-A-Watt device has a NEMA 5-15P plug, I simply plugged it into my Battery Backup (Uninterruptible Power Supply) and then the server’s power cord into the P3 Kill-A-Watt.

kill-a-watt Dell PowerEdge 2650 measuring 217 watts electical usage (cropped image)

In Pennsylvania, “The Electricity Generation Customer Choice and Competition Act” there are two main components to my monthly PECO invoice (as of April 2012):


Distribution Charge$0.0600 per kwh
Supply Charge$0.0759 per kwh
Total Charge$0.1359 per kwh

217 watts * 24 hours per day * 30 days per month = 156 kwh per month

156 kwh * $0.1359 per kwh = monthly cost of $21.20 per month to run this Dell PowerEdge server.

Without this P3 Kill-A-Watt device I had previously assumed that my Dell PowerEdge server with its 500 watt redundant power supplies was probably pulling in around 300 watts (typical usage, below the maximum value), it is nice to know that my actual usage is considerably below 300 watts, in the low 200’s.

Posted in Computer Miscellaneous, Dell PowerEdge 2650, Server/Systems Management | Leave a comment

A Passion for Glass that Burns Hotter than a 2000-Degree Furnace

Massimo Pulcini wrote the article below about Tony Patti’s glassblowing. It is re-published below with permission.

Massimo, whose native language is Italian (the primary language of glassblowing for the last five centuries), writes in a very Cameron Crowe-esque way.

In addition to this blog, the article can be found on the website here: http://www.glassblower.info/passion-for-glass.html

A Passion for Glass that Burns Hotter than a 2000-Degree Furnace…

by Massimo Pulcini

April 2, 2012

Creativity — the essence of imagination, the clay that sculpts dreams. Logic — the principle of validity, the foundation of reason. When juxtaposed, it’s hard to find some common ground between the two concepts.

In biology, the divide is more apparent. Cognitive theory suggests logic is handled primarily by the left brain, the hemisphere that acts as a neatly organized filing cabinet of numbers, arithmetic, and reason. Like a computer, it’s orderly, concise, and mapped out in black-and-white, ones-and-zeroes. It is the scientist, the mathematician, and the strategist. Meanwhile, the right brain is a Jackson Pollock-esque easel of expression. Controlling elements of abstraction, intuition, and emotion, the right brain is taste, color, and passion. It is the painter, the poet, and the free spirit.

Occasionally, you have those who can harness both hemispheres of grey matter to their maximum potential. Tony Patti is one of them. To those who do not know him, Tony comes across as your typical left-brained IT guy. On paper, his resume speaks for itself: with two degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, five published books on computerized mathematic cryptography, and an installation of 10 Dell servers in his home, Tony defines computer geek. But the CIO of S. Walter Packaging Co. in Northeast Philadelphia is more than your average computer whiz. Behind the glasses and under his head of dark-gray hair lies a unique artistic passion – a passion that burns hotter than a 2000-degree furnace, and a passion that redefined him. But to understand that fire, you first have to look back at Tony’s life.

Tony initially discovered his love for computers at a young age.

“I remember my dad subscribing to Business Week Magazine, and reading it at the kitchen table,” Tony recalled.

One day, he opened up an issue for himself – what he found there sparked the first ember in what would become an obsession for the young man.

“After reading (the magazine), it was clear that there was a lot of potential in the use of computers within business,” he explained. “It became fascinating to me how computers could ‘think'”.

In high school, Tony couldn’t wait for chemistry class to be over, only so he could get back to the computer, write more programs, and figure out how they worked. The first program he ever wrote was a simple game of Tic-Tac-Toe. But success didn’t come easy for the young programmer, who wrote the game a lot of wrong ways before finally figuring out how to get it to play. But as his interest and talent both progressed, Tony found himself in a unique situation because at the time, computers were not something most 17 or 18-year olds were thinking about, in part because his high school offered no Computer classes.

Keeping in line with the Business Week Magazine article he had read at the kitchen table, Tony wrote a program that handled airplane reservation systems, and used that for his application to the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, where he eventually earned an undergraduate degree in business as well as a Masters in Computer Science.

At college, Tony’s aptitude and enthusiasm for computers shined. During his freshman year, he took a job at the school’s computer center. By the time he had graduated, Tony was running the center and its million-dollar mainframe. But the long hours behind computer monitors and code did have an effect on Tony’s personality.

“In college I was extremely introverted, and part of that was because I was so fixed on finding how computers worked,” he explained. It wasn’t until years later that Tony found a new calling – one that would help break that introversion in the least expected way possible.

Many liken the Jersey Shore to boardwalk pizza, smelly beaches, and Snooki. To Tony Patti, it represents the start of something new.

“My wife and I were coming back home from a vacation down the Jersey Shore about 12 years ago,” he began to recall, “when my wife saw a sign for Wheaton Village. She said, ‘I read an article about that place, I want to stop and see what they have!” he said shrilly, as if to mimic the high pitch timbre of a woman’s voice.

At first, Tony wanted no part of Wheaton – his inner introvert reminded him that he had just been on vacation, and that now was time to get back home and do all the work he felt he had to do. But the will of a woman is strong, and the couple stopped anyway.

“Wives can be persuasive,” Tony laughed.

Located in Millville, New Jersey, Wheaton Village is now called Wheaton Arts, and is a glass blowing studio and museum. The studio had bleachers to allow for spectators to sit in and watch expert blowers turn molten sand into tangible objects. All it took was one pitcher to instantly captivate Tony.

“It was just a pitcher.you know, handle and spout, but I said, you know what, this is pretty cool!” Tony said. “Next, (the glassblower) wants to make a paper weight, and then something else, and like what? It’s just molten glass in there, and he decides what he wants to make without any limits — just his imagination and skill”. Suddenly, Tony was transfixed.

“Now it was my wife saying that we’ve got to go, and I’m saying, “I’m not leaving, I’m staying. You can go if you want!”.

Tony still has the receipt from the first paperweight he made at Wheaton that day, something that he sees as symbol of his new beginning.

Ever since, Tony has continued to blow glass at Buck County Community College, one of only two community colleges in Pennsylvania with a hot glass program. Starting out in Bucks. beginner class, Tony has completed 22 semesters of glassblowing to date and is now in the advanced class. Not bad for a two-year school, right?

Unlike Tony’s other passion, computers, glassblowing is an ancient art form. Developed by Romans around 50 B.C., it was during this time that modern day glassblowing techniques were formed. Through use of a blowpipe, blowing glass became a more efficient means of glass creation then the core-forming technique used before. But despite its archaic roots, the process of glassblowing has remained mostly unchanged over the past millennium.

“With exception to the computerized controllers that they didn’t have in the 1500’s, the basic tools are the same. If someone from back then came into the studio today, he could probably make a better piece of glass then I could,” Tony explained.

The process of blowing glass begins when the long, steel blowpipe is dipped into a radiating glob of molten glass. The glassblower evenly blows air through the hollowed tube, inflating the igneous sand into a red-hot balloon that burns like the sun itself, dramatically increasing its diameter. Starting meagerly with only a few ounces of glass, more and more is added after each additional gather, with the blower building onto the piece as he works with it. Each gather draws the glassblower to the furnace.a scorching oven so blistering that it could even make the Balrog break a sweat. Within its glistening array of dancing orange and yellow, flames rise up like daggers – though it’s the razor sharp glass that may end up cutting the weary glassblower in the end. Once the piece is considered done, the newly sculpted glass is constricted at the blowpipe end with massive, steel pincers called jacks, while a solid steel rod is used on the opposite end to break the piece off and open up the top, leaving the glassblower with a completed vessel.

The process is no cakewalk.

“Glassblowing is not a pleasant activity. You’re looking at a 2000-degree furnace — you’re only a couple of feet from it. But you learn to protect yourself from the heat that can fry you,” Tony explained.

What is it about the searing heat and roaring flames that keeps Tony so dedicated?

“When I get (to the studio) and pick up the blowpipe, nothing else matters,” said Tony. “All you care about is the glass that’s four feet ahead of you and making sure that it doesn’t fall on your feet so you can make it into something. It really melts away all the other stuff. That what it’s all about”.

Additionally, Tony loves glass for its unlimited potential, its uniqueness, and how it resonates with people. He sees it as a major reason why he is no longer an introvert.

“People have been supportive of my hobby – everyone knows I do it. If people didn’t know it was my interest, if I kept that to myself, you would never reach this additional synergy. And to me, that is really part of the fun,” he explained.

Through his glassblowing, Tony has connected to countless individuals. He has built a relationship with the Corning Museum of Glass in New York, even contributing an interview to their series on glass history, as well as building his own glassblower network through his website Glassblower.info, the world’s largest glassblowing website.

Being the IT guy he is, Tony explains it as a concept of networking.

“One of the great things about networking, and not in a hardware or a computer sense but as in the networking between people, is that when people know what you’re interested in, (the interest) becomes self fulfilling and it reaches a critical mass,” he said.

Tony proves that you are not limited to one-half of your mind, but stresses, “I’m not in any way unique in having this left brain-right brain balance. The evolution of introvert to extrovert can happen over time. I don’t think you ever lose that computer geek core, but it morphs until you can become that computer geek that can talk to people”.

Master Venetian glass Maestros say that the glass speaks to them, and at this point in his life, Tony believes that he can hear it too.

“All a glass blower needs is skill and imagination. I think the harder part is the skill — at least I know I’ve got the imagination,” he smiled.

Posted in Glassblowing Miscellaneous | Leave a comment

Peco Exelon Telephone Pole Replacement

After the car accident April 15, 2012 which I blogged about here, I was fascinated by the teamwork of these Peco Exelon employees who replaced in a few hours the destroyed telephone pole.

Watching them men work so high up, with all their equipment, and in the presence of dangerous high voltage, very much reminded me of the ballet of glassblowers working, which I’ve often written about on these pages.

Thanks to those men, our power never went out, while this work was being performed!

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

A piece of the old telephone pole, with many cables still attached can still be seen next to the new telephone pole:

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Peco Exelon Telephone Replacement after Car Accident April 15 2012

Posted in Interesting | 1 Comment

Dell PowerEdge 2650 in the movie “Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol”

I was watching the 2011 movie “Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol” the other night, thanks to Netflix, and at 1:00:28 what do I see in in the server room?

Yes, a Dell PowerEdge 2650, and that’s Tom Cruise’s gloved hand after inserting the USB drive to hack into that server.

Dell PowerEdge 2650 in the Movie Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol with Tom Cruise

Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol Movie Poster - Tom Cruise - Dell PowerEdge 2650

Posted in Dell PowerEdge 2650 | Leave a comment

Car Accident April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Car Accident - Telephone Pole - April 15 2012

Posted in Interesting | 2 Comments

Glass Flowers in the Garden

Today I updated my Glass Flowers (Paperweights) web page with this photo of seven pressed (two-part molded) glass flowers, in my garden, on copper stems:

Glass Flowers in the Garden

Tony Patti
www.glassblower.info
gaffer@glassblower.info

Posted in Glassblowing Miscellaneous | Comments Off on Glass Flowers in the Garden

Glass Cullet in Landscaping

I just finished a web page which shows some photos of the use of glass cullet in landscaping.

Glass is so beautiful, especially more so on a bright sunny day

(well, OK, these photos were taken during the winter)

Glass Cullet in Landscaping

Tony Patti
www.glassblower.info
gaffer@glassblower.info

Posted in Glassblowing Miscellaneous | 1 Comment